Need to talk? Call 1800 882 436.
It's a free call with a maternal child health nurse. *call charges may apply from your mobile

Is it an emergency? Dial 000
If you need urgent medical help, call triple zero immediately.

beginning of content

Camping out — a sleep technique for babies

4-minute read

What is 'camping out'?

Camping out is a sleep technique that can help you gradually teach babies of at least 6 months to fall asleep by themselves. It usually takes about 3 weeks.

When babies are very little, many parents help them to sleep by patting, rocking or holding them. The problem is that babies start to depend on these things to fall asleep. If they wake up during the night, they will not be able to get back to sleep without them.

Camping out is a technique you can use to gradually teach your baby how to go to sleep by themselves. The idea is that you are still by their side to provide reassurance, but you do not physically help them to fall asleep.

Camping out is different from controlled comforting, where you comfort your baby and then leave them alone in the room.

Who is camping out for?

The camping out technique is designed for babies who are at least 6 months old. It can also help older children learn to fall asleep by themselves, especially if they are anxious or frightened.

You might consider camping out if your baby is having ongoing problems falling asleep, or is waking up and crying repeatedly during the night.

Step-by-step guide to camping out

Before you start, it is important to have a good sleep routine in place. You could also consider talking to a maternal child health nurse. That is because any new sleep strategy is more likely to succeed if you do it with professional help.

When you are ready, follow these steps:

  1. Place a mattress or chair next to the baby’s cot.
  2. When it is bedtime, put your baby in the cot and stroke or pat them until they fall asleep. When they are asleep, leave the room. Repeat this step every time they wake up through the night. It usually takes 3 nights for your baby to learn to fall asleep like this.
  3. Once your baby can fall asleep like this, start to gradually reduce the time you pat or stroke them. The idea is for your baby to learn to fall asleep as you sit or lie quietly next to them, without touching them. Repeat this step every time they wake up through the night. It will probably take another 3 nights for your baby to learn to fall asleep like this.
  4. When your baby can fall asleep without you touching them, move the mattress or chair about 50cm away from the cot. Stay there quietly until your baby falls asleep. Return to the mattress or chair in the same position if they wake up during the night, and stay there until they go back to sleep.
  5. Over the next few weeks, gradually move the mattress or chair further away from the cot and out of the door.

Tips for making camping out work

Camping out will work best if you follow the routine consistently. Make sure everyone who puts your baby to bed uses the technique in exactly the same way.

Make sure things are calm and quiet and that the room is dim. Reassure your baby that you will not leave them, but try not to interact too much. This is a time for sleeping, not for play. Try to avoid making eye contact with your baby while they are trying to go to sleep. You could close your eyes, too.

If your baby starts to cry, pat them to comfort them. If they are very upset, you can pick them up and comfort them. When they are calm, start the process again.

Will camping out work?

Every baby is different. Some babies learn to settle themselves quickly with this technique, while others take longer. Do not rush things, just try to be consistent.

Sometimes babies sleep well for a few nights and then go back to their old behaviour. Their sleep can also be affected by illness, holidays or visitors. Most of these changes will be temporary. Stick to the routine, keep using the technique, and things should sort themselves out.

Camping out works for most babies after 2 to 3 weeks. If your baby is not settling any better after this time, talk to your doctor or maternal child health nurse about what else you can do.

Call Pregnancy, Birth and Baby on 1800 882 436 to speak to a maternal child health nurse.

Learn more here about the development and quality assurance of healthdirect content.

Last reviewed: March 2021


Back To Top

Need more information?

Newborns sleep | Raising Children Network

Need help understanding newborn sleep? Here’s all you need on newborn sleep with articles, videos and resources on safe sleep, sleep habits, tiredness and more.

Read more on raisingchildren.net.au website

How newborns sleep - Ngala

Sleep is necessary for all of us

Read more on Ngala website

Newborn sleep: what to expect | Raising Children Network

Newborns sleep differently from older babies, children and adults. They usually sleep in short bursts in the day and night, and wake several times at night.

Read more on raisingchildren.net.au website

Baby and newborn sleep routines: a guide | Raising Children Network

In the early months, it’s best to respond to newborn needs for sleeps and feeds. Follow baby’s lead when it comes to a routine for feeds, sleep and play. Article available in: Arabic, Dari, Karen, Persian, Simplified Chinese, Vietnamese

Read more on raisingchildren.net.au website

Camping out: child & baby sleep strategy | Raising Children Network

Problems with baby sleep and settling, or toddler waking? The camping out baby sleep strategy gradually reduces the settling help your child needs. Read how.

Read more on raisingchildren.net.au website

Baby & Newborn Tip Sheets | Tresillian

See our tips for looking after your baby or newborn. Sleeping, settling, nutrition and more. Tresillian are here to help.

Read more on Tresillian website

A day in the life of a newborn

Most babies will start to settle into a daily pattern of sleeping, feeding and playing, whether you follow what your newborn does or establish a simple routine.

Read more on Pregnancy, Birth & Baby website

Newborn clothes & dressing a newborn | Raising Children Network

How many clothes does a newborn need? And what newborn clothes are best? Get answers to these questions and more in our guide to dressing a newborn.

Read more on raisingchildren.net.au website

Sleep Tips for New Mothers

1.Plan for the fact that your sleep pattern is going to change Babies are not born with a day-night wake-sleep cycle.  They develop this over the first 3 months following birth.  So whilst a newborn baby may sleep a lot, they will also wake up a lot for feeds and other attention and will do so at all hours

Read more on Sleep Health Foundation website

Newborn baby routines: in pictures | Raising Children Network

Newborn baby routines are all about responding to your baby’s needs for feeds and sleep. It’s good to make time for gentle play too. Get tips in pictures.

Read more on raisingchildren.net.au website

Call us and speak to a Maternal Child Health Nurse for personal advice and guidance.

Need further advice or guidance from our maternal child health nurses?

This information is for your general information and use only and is not intended to be used as medical advice and should not be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any medical condition, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes.

The information is not a substitute for independent professional advice and should not be used as an alternative to professional health care. If you have a particular medical problem, please consult a healthcare professional.

Except as permitted under the Copyright Act 1968, this publication or any part of it may not be reproduced, altered, adapted, stored and/or distributed in any form or by any means without the prior written permission of Healthdirect Australia.