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Pregnancy week-by-week

Pregnancy at weeks 1 to 4

When you conceive, your body’s hormone levels change, but you may not notice any signs that you’re pregnant yet.

Pregnancy at week 5

You may still wonder, at week 5, if you are pregnant, but you can do a pregnancy test the day after you miss a period.

Pregnancy at week 6

By week 6, your baby is growing quickly and you may notice the early signs of your pregnancy, such as feeling nauseous.

Pregnancy at week 7

Your baby is now about 1cm long and if you haven’t seen your doctor yet, now is a good time to start your antenatal care.

Pregnancy at week 8

By week 8, you might be experiencing morning sickness, need frequent trips to the toilet, and feel tired or moody.

Pregnancy at week 9

Your baby is now the size of a peanut. You won't be showing just yet, but you may have put on a little weight.

Pregnancy at week 10

Think about the prenatal screening tests you might have, and whether you want a dating scan to confirm your due date.

Pregnancy at week 11

During week 11, you might have your first ultrasound and see your baby for the first time.

Pregnancy at week 12

By week 12, your baby is the size of a plum but fully formed, with their organs, muscles, limbs and bones in place.

Pregnancy at week 5

At week 13 of pregnancy, you officially enter your second trimester and hopefully any morning sickness has eased off.

Pregnancy at week 14

By week 14, your baby’s organs have formed, their face is becoming more recognisable, and you may be feeling more energetic.

Pregnancy at week 15

By week 15, your baby may be able to respond to sound and light, while you are gaining weight and your skin and hair are changing.

Pregnancy at week 16

At week 16, you might begin to feel your baby moving, while hormonal changes may be affecting your libido.

Pregnancy at week 17

By week 17, you may want to start thinking about antenatal classes to help you and your partner prepare for the birth and beyond.

Pregnancy at week 18

By week 18, you may start to feel light-headed and dizzy, but you may also be able to find out whether you’re having a boy or a girl.

Pregnancy at week 19

By week 19, you will likely look very obviously pregnant, while your baby can now hear sounds from outside your body.

Pregnancy at week 20

By week 20, your baby is very active although you might feel breathless now and then and your back and hips may ache.

Pregnancy at week 21

At week 21, you should consider whether to do any travel since you may not be able to for much longer in your pregnancy.

Pregnancy at week 22

By week 22, some parts of your baby’s body are fully formed, while some women experience Braxton Hicks contractions about now.

Pregnancy at week 23

By week 23, your baby is practising to breathe in the womb and you might be experiencing some incontinence.

Pregnancy at week 24

Your baby is continuing to grow rapidly and might respond to light and sound. You might also find their movements are getting stronger.

Pregnancy at week 25

As you are approaching the end of the second trimester, you might be starting to feel a bit uncomfortable as your baby continues to grow.

Pregnancy at week 26

Your baby is starting to put on fat and muscle and as your baby grows, your centre of gravity will shift, so you might find that you are starting to w...

Pregnancy at week 27

Your baby is growing fast and probably quite active now. You'll also be gaining more weight and might even be getting some stretch marks.

Pregnancy at week 28

You are now in the third trimester and you'll probably be feeling many of the common discomforts of pregnancy, like a sore back, swelling, heartburn o...

Pregnancy at week 29

Your baby should weigh about 1kg by now and as your uterus pushes against your diaphragm and lungs, you might be feeling quite breathless.

Pregnancy at week 30

Your baby's reflexes are developing, and they may even be sucking their thumb or fingers. You might be tired and sore, but try to exercise and get eno...

Pregnancy at week 31

Feeling tired and emotional during the third trimester is very common, but it's important to discuss these feelings with your doctor or midwife.

Pregnancy at week 32

Your baby doesn't have a lot of room, but they will still be moving. The extra weight might cause you some back and pelvic pain which can make it diff...

Pregnancy at week 33

Your baby's brain and nervous system are now fully developed, and the baby is continuing to gain weight. You'll probably also be feeling sore and tire...

Pregnancy at week 34

As at the start of your pregnancy, you’re probably feeling tired and emotional. The baby doesn't have much room to move, but you might feel them kick ...

Pregnancy at week 35

You'll probably be having lots of Braxton Hicks contractions by now. It's your body's way of preparing for the birth. They should stop if you move pos...

Pregnancy at week 36

Your baby will by now be curled up and cramped inside your uterus and weigh about 2.5kg. Your bump may have moved down, putting pressure on your lower...

Pregnancy at week 37

By the end of week 37, your baby is considered full-term. You'll probably be very tired because of the extra weight so try and get as much rest as you...

Pregnancy at week 38

Your baby is now ready to be born and you could go into labour at any time. Make sure you have you plan for getting to the hospital and you have every...

Pregnancy at week 39

Your baby's weight gain should slow down since they are now ready to be born. You might soon start to notice the early signs of labour.

Pregnancy at week 40

Your baby will arrive very soon – if it hasn't already. Babies are rarely born on their due date and many go past 40 weeks.

Call us and speak to a Maternal Child Health Nurse for personal advice and guidance.

Need further advice or guidance from our maternal child health nurses?

This information is for your general information and use only and is not intended to be used as medical advice and should not be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any medical condition, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes.

The information is not a substitute for independent professional advice and should not be used as an alternative to professional health care. If you have a particular medical problem, please consult a healthcare professional.

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