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Anatomy of pregnancy and birth - pelvis

The pelvis helps carry your growing baby and is especially tailored for vaginal births. Learn more about the structure and function of the female pelvis.

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What happens to your body in childbirth

During childbirth, your body's hormones, ligaments and muscles, as well as the shape of your pelvis, all work together to bring your baby safely into the world.

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Positions for labour and birth

Choosing your positions for labour and birth can help you feel in control, reduce pain and open your pelvis to help the baby come out.

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Anatomy of pregnancy and birth - perineum and pelvic floor

The perineum – the skin between the vagina and anus - stretches during childbirth and can sometimes tear. Learn here how to prepare the perineum for the birth.

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Anatomy of pregnancy and birth - abdominal muscles

The abdominal muscles have an important role in pregnancy. Strengthening your abdominal muscles during pregnancy and after having your baby will help these muscles work as they should.

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Anatomy of pregnancy and birth

From conception to giving birth, a woman's body goes through many physical changes. Learn what happens to your body during pregnancy and labour.

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Looking after your back during pregnancy

Backache during pregnancy is very common, and you are also at greater risk of back injury. Learn how to protect your back to prevent both injury and discomfort.

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Pregnancy at week 36

Your baby will by now be curled up and cramped inside your uterus and weigh about 2.5kg. Your bump may have moved down, putting pressure on your lower abdomen.

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Birth injury (to the mother)

Giving birth doesn't always go to plan. Birth injuries to the mother, such as tears, pelvic floor damage or haemorrhoids, can occur. But support and treatment are available.

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Pelvic pain in pregnancy

Some women develop pelvic pain in pregnancy. This is sometimes called pelvic girdle pain (PGP) in pregnancy or symphysis pubis dysfunction (SPD).

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