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Search results for: "Vaccination"

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COVID-19 vaccine

COVID-19 vaccine information for the Western Australian community.

Read more on WA Health website

Influenza vaccination in pregnancy | Australian Government Department of Health

The influenza vaccine is provided at no cost for pregnant women through the National Immunisation Program. If you’re pregnant, speak to your doctor, nurse, or midwife today.

Read more on Department of Health website

6 months | Sharing Knowledge about Immunisation | SKAI

When your baby is six months old, one age-specific vaccine is recommended: the combined DTPa-Hib-IPV-HepB vaccine. This vaccine protects your baby from six diseases. Before influenza season, it is also recommended that your baby gets an influenza vaccine. The vaccines are given as needles, usually in baby’s leg.

Read more on National Centre for Immunisation Research and Surveillance (NCIRS) website

4 years | Sharing Knowledge about Immunisation | SKAI

When your child is four years old, one age-specific vaccine is recommended: a combined DTPa/IPV vaccine. This vaccine strengthens their immunity to diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis and polio. It is also recommended that your child gets an influenza vaccine every year before the influenza season. These vaccines are given as needles, usually in your child’s arm.

Read more on National Centre for Immunisation Research and Surveillance (NCIRS) website

12 months | Sharing Knowledge about Immunisation | SKAI

Now that your child is 12 months old, three age-specific vaccines are recommended: 4vMenCV, 13vPCV and MMR. These three vaccines help protect your child from five diseases. It is also recommended that your child gets an influenza vaccine every year before influenza season. The vaccines are given as needles, usually in your child’s arms.

Read more on National Centre for Immunisation Research and Surveillance (NCIRS) website

The flu jab, explained - NPS MedicineWise

Get your flu jab now -- everything you need to know about flu vaccination in 2021

Read more on NPS MedicineWise website

Influenza | NCIRS

Webinar video now available - Australia’s COVID-19 vaccine program reset: navigating safety, acceptance and uptakeRead the full article

Read more on National Centre for Immunisation Research and Surveillance (NCIRS) website

Cervical cancer screening | Cancer Council

Read about the cervical screening program designed to work together with the HPV vaccination program, to help reduce the incidence of cervical cancer

Read more on Cancer Council Australia website

Influenza | Sharing Knowledge about Immunisation | SKAI

What are the side effects of influenza vaccines? Common side effects About 10 per cent of children (1 out of every 10) who have an influenza vaccine experience swelling, redness, pain at the injection site that lasts one or two days.  Between 1 per cent and 10 per cent of people (1–10 out of every 100) who have an influenza vaccine get a fever, headache, tiredness or lack of energy (malaise) or muscle aches (myalgia) that last one or two days.    Rare side effects

Read more on National Centre for Immunisation Research and Surveillance (NCIRS) website

Flu vaccination and pregnancy – Vaccinate against flu. Protect your baby too | Australian Government Department of Health

The flu shot is safe for pregnant women, and provides effective protection for you and your new-born baby for the first six months of their life.

Read more on Department of Health website

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The information is not a substitute for independent professional advice and should not be used as an alternative to professional health care. If you have a particular medical problem, please consult a healthcare professional.

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