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Search results for: "Mastitis"

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Mastitis

Mastitis occurs when breast tissue gets inflamed, usually due to a blocked milk duct caused by breastfeeding. Mastitis can lead to infection.

Read more on Pregnancy, Birth & Baby website

Sore, cracked or bleeding nipples

Sore, cracked or bleeding nipples are common problems for breastfeeding mothers.

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Breast engorgement

Engorgement is usually temporary and eventually you will produce just as much milk as your baby needs.

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Engorgement and mastitis - myDr.com.au

If you experience difficulties with breastfeeding, such as engorgement or mastitis, seek the advice of a midwife, lactation consultant, the Australian Breastfeeding Association or your doctor.

Read more on myDr website

Mastitis | Australian Breastfeeding Association

Mastitis is an inflammation in the breast tissue (also sometimes called 'milk fever'), often caused by a blocked milk duct that hasn't cleared. Infection may or may not be present. Read about the symptoms and what you can do to relieve mastitis.

Read more on Australian Breastfeeding Association website

Breastfeeding - dealing with mastitis - Better Health Channel

Mastitis affects some breastfeeding women and may be caused by blocked milk ducts or a bacterial infection.

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Mastitis, blocked duct & breast abscess | Raising Children Network

If you think you have a blocked milk duct, you can treat it at home to start with. If you think you have mastitis or a breast abscess, see your GP as soon as possible.

Read more on raisingchildren.net.au website

Newborns breastfeeding & bottle-feeding | Raising Children Network

All you need to know on breastfeeding and bottle-feeding newborns. Get articles, videos and resources on breastfeeding, bottle-feeding, mastitis and more.

Read more on raisingchildren.net.au website

Breast abscess | Australian Breastfeeding Association

When mastitis is not treated promptly, a breast abscess can form. This may require the mother to go to hospital and have the abscess surgically drained. In some cases, the mother can avoid hospital but, over several days, her medical adviser will drain the abscess using a syringe. This does not mean the end of breastfeeding. However, if the drain in the wound is close to the nipple, the baby may not be able to attach to that side for a while.

Read more on Australian Breastfeeding Association website

Breast care for breastfeeding mothers after the death of a child | Sydney Children's Hospitals Network

Time after the death of your infant can be physically and emotionally exhausting

Read more on Sydney Children's Hospitals Network website

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The information is not a substitute for independent professional advice and should not be used as an alternative to professional health care. If you have a particular medical problem, please consult a healthcare professional.

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