Need to talk? Call 1800 882 436.
It's a free call with a maternal child health nurse. *call charges may apply from your mobile

Is it an emergency? Dial 000
If you need urgent medical help, call triple zero immediately.

beginning of content

Search results for: "Itching"

Need more information?

Itching during pregnancy

Mild itching is common in pregnancy because of the increased blood supply to the skin, but if the itching becomes severe it can be a sign of a liver condition called 'obstetric cholestasis'.

Read more on Pregnancy, Birth & Baby website

Complications during pregnancy

Some women will experience complications such as bleeding, itching high blood pressure or severe vomiting during pregnancy that will require treatment.

Read more on Pregnancy, Birth & Baby website

Eczema - Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy (ASCIA)

Eczema is a chronic health condition that affects the skin, causing redness, dryness itching and sometimes infections. When eczema worsens it is called an eczema flare and usually there is no single factor for an eczema flare. Eczema flares can be triggered by a range of irritants (see Q 8) or for no obvious reason.

Read more on ASCIA – Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy website

Chickenpox - MyDr.com.au

Chickenpox is a highly contagious disease caused by a viral infection. Most children with chickenpox develop an itchy rash that lasts for about 10 days.

Read more on myDr website

Scabies treatment & causes: kids & teens | Raising Children Network

Scabies is an itchy rash that looks like red threads on the skin. Read about scabies in children, with information on scabies causes and scabies treatment.

Read more on raisingchildren.net.au website

Threadworms

Threadworms, also called pinworms, are tiny, very thin white worms about 5 millimetres long that live in the intestine and around the anus.

Read more on Queensland Health website

Hives or urticaria in children & teenagers | Raising Children Network

If your child has raised white, pink or red spots that form an itchy rash, it might be hives or urticaria. It’s a good idea to take your child to the GP.

Read more on raisingchildren.net.au website

Eczema (Atopic Dermatitis) - Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy (ASCIA)

Eczema (Atopic Dermatitis)

Read more on ASCIA – Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy website

Urticaria (Hives) - Allergy & Anaphylaxis Australia

Urticaria (commonly known as hives) are mosquito bite like swellings on the surface of the skin that range in size from a few millimetres to several centimetres. They may last minutes or hours and can change shape from round to oval, forming rings or patches. The skin swelling seen in urticaria is due to the release of chemicals such as histamine from mast cells in the skin that causes small blood vessels to leak. They are often itchy, but sometimes may not be itchy at all.

Read more on Allergy and Anaphylaxis Australia website

ACD A-Z of Skin - Polymorphic eruption of pregnancy

Polymorphic eruption of pregnancy (PEP) is a relatively common pregnancy dermatosis that causes very itchy red bumps to appear over the abdomen.

Read more on Australasian College of Dermatologists website

Call us and speak to a Maternal Child Health Nurse for personal advice and guidance.

Need further advice or guidance from our maternal child health nurses?

This information is for your general information and use only and is not intended to be used as medical advice and should not be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any medical condition, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes.

The information is not a substitute for independent professional advice and should not be used as an alternative to professional health care. If you have a particular medical problem, please consult a healthcare professional.

Except as permitted under the Copyright Act 1968, this publication or any part of it may not be reproduced, altered, adapted, stored and/or distributed in any form or by any means without the prior written permission of Healthdirect Australia.