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Search results for: "Reproductive health"

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Preconception health for women

If you want to have a baby, being healthy is one of the best ways to improve your chances of falling pregnant and having a healthy baby.

Read more on Pregnancy, Birth & Baby website

Fertility and cancer

Some cancers and cancer treatments can affect your fertility. Before starting a treatment, you might want to consider the options for preserving your fertility.

Read more on Pregnancy, Birth & Baby website

Preserving fertility

You may not be able to try for a baby right now, but if you want to keep your options open for the future, there are ways to preserve your fertility.

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Ovulation signs

Knowing when you ovulate and having sex at the right time is important when you are trying to fall pregnant.

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Understanding fertility

Learn how to improve your fertility and what you and your partner can do to improve your chances of falling pregnant.

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Vaginal ultrasound

A vaginal ultrasound (also called an internal, pelvic or transvaginal ultrasound) lets a medical professional observe a fetus and check reproductive health.

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Reproductive health | Australian Government Department of Health

Good reproductive health allows women and men to decide if and when to have children. It can be affected by some diseases, access to contraceptives and fertility issues. Find out what we’re doing to improve reproductive health services in Australia.

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Reproductive system - Better Health Channel

betterhealth.vic.gov.au

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Maximising Natural Fertility | Family Planning NSW

Today people often leave plans for pregnancy until later in their adult lives. This is different to previous generations. Women are naturally more fertile in their 20s than their 30s but women are more often having children when they are aged 30-34 years old.

Read more on Family Planning NSW website

Uterus, cervix & ovaries - fact sheet | Jean Hailes

This fact sheet discusses some of the health conditions that may affect a woman's uterus, cervix and ovaries.

Read more on Jean Hailes for Women's Health website

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The information is not a substitute for independent professional advice and should not be used as an alternative to professional health care. If you have a particular medical problem, please consult a healthcare professional.

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