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Search results for: "Cervical Cancer"

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Cervical screening during pregnancy

Cervical screening can be performed at any time, including during pregnancy. Regular cervical screening is the best way to protect yourself against cervical cancer.

Read more on Pregnancy, Birth & Baby website

Cervical Cancer - Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently asked questions of the Australian Cervical Cancer Foundation. FAQ

Read more on Australian Cervical Cancer Foundation website

Cervical cancer screening | Cancer Council

Read about the cervical screening program designed to work together with the HPV vaccination program, to help reduce the incidence of cervical cancer

Read more on Cancer Council Australia website

Cervical cancer and motherhood

Cervical cancer and motherhood Posted on 22/04/2016 by Nii Anang Posted in Blog “Being a mum is all I ever wanted, and I had started to think it would never happen” For many women, becoming a mother is something they’ve waited their whole life for

Read more on Australian Cervical Cancer Foundation website

Your questions answered on cervical screening tests | Know Pathology Know Healthcare

A cytologist answers questions about cervical cancer screening and why you should get up to date

Read more on Know Pathology Know Healthcare website

Pap smear tests - MyDr.com.au

Pap smear tests are currently used in Australia as a screening test for cervical cancer. A Pap smear test can detect changes in the cells of the cervix that may develop into cancer.

Read more on myDr website

National Cervical Screening Program | Australian Government Department of Health and Aged Care

The National Cervical Screening Program reduces illness and death from cervical cancer. Women and people with a cervix aged 25 to 74 years of age are invited to have a Cervical Screening Test every 5 years through their healthcare provider.

Read more on Department of Health and Aged Care website

Samantha’s story - Surviving HPV related cancer | Australian Government Department of Health and Aged Care

Samantha survived a rare but aggressive form of cervical cancer that her doctor said was highly likely caused by human papillomavirus (HPV). She urges all parents to sign the consent form so their child can be protected against HPV related disease as part of the school based immunisation program.

Read more on Department of Health and Aged Care website

Understanding your Pap test or cervical screening test results | Cancer Council

The Pap test (sometimes called the Pap smear) has changed to the cervical screening test. Find out about how the changes impact you here

Read more on Cancer Council Australia website

Cervical Cancer Screening & HPV Vaccine - Cancer Council Victoria

All women aged 25 to 74 who have ever been sexually active should have a Cervical Screening Test every 5 years.

Read more on Cancer Council Victoria website

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