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Weight gain in pregnancy

As your baby grows, you will gradually gain weight. How much weight you gain will depend on how much you weighed before your pregnancy.

Read more on Pregnancy, Birth & Baby website

How much weight will I gain during pregnancy? | Queensland Health

Find out how much weight you should expect to gain at each stage of pregnancy, based on your BMI, and tips on what to eat and how to exercise while pregnant.

Read more on Queensland Health website

Why Your Weight Matters during Pregnancy

Weight is a very sensitive subject for some women. However, because of the great benefit to you and your baby, it is recommended that you should try to reach a healthy weight before you become pregnant.

Read more on RANZCOG - Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists website

Pregnancy and your diet - NT.GOV.AU

Foods you should avoid, listeriosis information, mercury in fish, weight gain in pregnancy.

Read more on NT Health website

Pregnancy & weight | Jean Hailes

Managing your weight while you are pregnant is not always easy. Knowing how much weight gain and what you can do to keep active is helpful. …

Read more on Jean Hailes for Women's Health website

Pregnancy weight gain

Pregnancy weight gain is normally 11.5-16kg. Gaining too much weight during pregnancy is unhealthy. Overweight and obese pregnant women should gain only 5-9kg.

Read more on Parenthub website

Childhood obesity - MyDr.com.au

More than one in 4 kids aged 5-17 years in Australia is above a healthy weight. Find out how to help kids make changes to their diet and activity levels.

Read more on myDr website

Overweight women and healthy pregnancy | Raising Children Network

Being overweight can cause complications in pregnancy. You can reach a healthier weight with changes to diet and activity levels and weight management advice.

Read more on raisingchildren.net.au website

1 week pregnant

The first week of pregnancy occurs before you actually conceive your new baby. It’s a little confusing - doctors begin counting the weeks of your pregnancy from the date your last menstrual bleeding started, not from the date you conceived. Conception, that very important moment at which your partner’s sperm fertilises your egg, does not occur until approximately two weeks after the start of your last period. However, your body is already preparing itself for pregnancy, should conception occur, so this week officially marks the beginning of the pregnancy.

Read more on Parenthub website

Pregnancy planning for dads

A healthy pregnancy takes two and men need to prepare their bodies and their sperm to ensure they are optimally healthy at the time of conception. Many lifestyle measures, including eating a healthy balanced diet, exercising and avoiding drugs and alcohol, can improve a man’s health and the health of his sperm. In many cases these measures not only increase the chances of conception they also ensure the pregnancy gets off to the healthiest start possible.

Read more on Parenthub website

Call us and speak to a Maternal Child Health Nurse for personal advice and guidance.

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This information is for your general information and use only and is not intended to be used as medical advice and should not be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any medical condition, nor should it be used for therapeutic purposes.

The information is not a substitute for independent professional advice and should not be used as an alternative to professional health care. If you have a particular medical problem, please consult a healthcare professional.

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